Along with millions of other viewers, we were gripped by the recent BBC drama Bodyguard. So our interest was well and truly piqued when we heard that a Shakespeare-influenced fan theory had emerged, which claims the series contains numerous references to Romeo and Juliet…

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We love a mystery (and a Shakespearean challenge), so we decided to see if we could piece together the entire theory based on just the few tweets and headlines we’d already seen…

So here goes. We understand that the theory is based on the fact that the co-lead character in Bodyguard is named Julia Montague. But first…

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Bodyguard is written/created by Jed Mercurio. Does he have a thing about Romeo and Juliet? Well, interestingly his name is almost exactly the same as Mercutio – Romeo’s best friend.

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Mercurio and Mercutio are both Italian names, both derived from the Roman god Mercury. This is also where we get the word ‘mercurial’, meaning ‘unpredictable’. Shakespeare’s Mercutio is certainly that.

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Mercutio’s legendary death-scene line: “A plague a’ both your houses”. There is certainly the suggestion in Bodyguard that both sides – indeed all the squabbling factions – are totally corrupt, and happy to let innocent people suffer and die.

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Romeo is a Montague, Juliet is a Capulet. They marry (and die) very young, causing the reconciliation of their warring families. In Bodyguard, Julia Montague is the Home Secretary, a mature and highly-successful woman.

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Is Julia Montague the writer’s idea of how Juliet might have turned out if she lived in our era?

(In the way that The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo was supposedly a grown-up, modern-day version of Pippi Longstocking)

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Okay, so if Julia is Juliet, who’s Romeo? Not her conniving Chief Whip ex-husband Roger Penhaligon*, that’s for sure.

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(*By the way, famous Cornish actress Susan Penhaligon got her first break playing – you guessed it – Juliet)

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We forgot to mention that Julia Montague is played by the marvellous Keeley Hawes! We don’t know if she’s ever played Juliet, but here she is as Shakespeare’s Elizabeth Woodville in The Hollow Crown: The Wars of the Roses.

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The obvious candidate for Romeo is the Bodyguard himself, David Budd, played by Richard Madden.

Incidentally, Richard played Romeo on the stage a couple of years ago – and was even featured on the cover of Shakespeare Magazine.

And, of course, David Budd. As in Rose Bud. As in Juliet’s famous musing on Romeo: “That which we call a rose / By any other name would smell as sweet…”

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As we hinted before, every Romeo needs a Mercutio. Just like Mercutio, David’s friend Andy is a loose cannon and a cryptic truth-teller. And as with Romeo and Mercutio, David is ultimately responsible for Andy’s death.

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David Westhead, who plays the Prime Minister in Bodyguard, appeared in the 2007 Doctor Who story The Shakespeare Code as “Will Kempe”. We know for a fact that famed clown Kempe (or Kemp) appeared in the ORIGINAL production of Romeo and Juliet – he’s named in the stage directions.

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The one thing everyone knows about Romeo and Juliet: THEY DIE. And the hospital staff affirm that Julia Montague did indeed shuffle off her mortal coil – after injuries sustained in the mysterious explosion that interrupted her controversial speech.

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But Shakespeare’s not that simple. Juliet, advised by a friar, takes a potion that simulates death. Unaware of the plan, Romeo kills himself. Juliet wakes up, sees Romeo dead, and in turn kills herself.

This doesn’t sound a lot like Bodyguard.

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This is why fans reckon that Julia (like Juliet) may not actually be dead. Will she return in the final episode? Also, David (like Romeo) did try to kill himself after learning of Julia’s demise. But someone put a blank round in his gun, so he survived.

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One of the most popular characters in Romeo and Juliet is Juliet’s Nurse. And there is a nurse in Bodyguard (albeit of the medical variety) in the form of David’s estranged wife Vicky, played by Sophie Rundle – who looks rather like traditional depictions of Juliet.

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And from among the other characters, here’s top cop Ann Sampson, played by Gina McKee. The first line in Romeo and Juliet is spoken by Sampson of the Capulets, who then bites his thumb at the Montagues to start a brawl.

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To conclude, yes, Bodyguard does seem to have quite a few Romeo and Juliet references. But essentially it’s a political/terrorism drama, so we don’t think it really qualifies as a remake or reimagining of Shakespeare’s play.

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Crucially, Romeo and Juliet are young. They’re star-cross’d lovers whose families are at war. They confide in Friar Lawrence and he marries them in secret. David and Julia are mature adults who embark on a clandestine affair. It’s very different.

And, lest we forget, Romeo and Juliet contains some of the most heartbreakingly beautiful poetry in the English language.

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Bodyguard isn’t in quite the same league.

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Heck of a thriller, though. Even if we didn’t get the stupendously Shakespearean showdown were hoping for in the final episode…

Here endeth our take on “Bodyguard – the Romeo and Juliet Connection”. Do let us know if you spot any Shakespearean references or themes we’ve missed!

Hail to the Bard! The shiny new-look Shakespeare Magazine 11 is adorned with a simply stunning cover image of rising young stars Lily James and Richard Madden in Kenneth Branagh’s Romeo and Juliet

It’s here! Please, read, enjoy and share far & wide the completely free delight that is Shakespeare Magazine 11!

Issue 11 Cover

The shiny new-look Shakespeare Magazine 11 is adorned with a simply stunning cover image of rising young stars Lily James and Richard Madden in Kenneth Branagh’s Romeo and Juliet.

Head straight to page 6 to discover what our reviewer thought of the production. (Clue: she loved it)

Also in Issue 11, SK Moore tells us about his compelling new graphic novel of Shakespeare’s Macbeth, while broadcaster Samira Ahmed turns her magnificently mercurial mind to the subject of Shakespeare.

We have words with Pub Landlord comedian Al Murray about his recent brush with the Bard (and Judi Dench) at RSC Shakespeare Live.

And our Editor gorges himself on a 3-DVD box set of 1960s television Shakespeare classic The Wars of the Roses.

Check out our chat with the great Don Warrington, star of Talawa Theatre’s earth-shaking King Lear at Manchester’s Royal Exchange – youthful co-star Alfred Enoch joins in too.

Following up last issue’s cheeky Shakespeare/Star Wars feature we’ve dared to imagine what Tom Hiddleston’s Hamlet would look like. (Looks pretty darn cool, actually)

We also take the opportunity to explore the life of Elizabeth Siddal, the model for Millais’ classic Victorian painting of Shakespeare’s Ophelia.

And last but very much not least, Bristol’s Insane Root Theatre take us very deep into a cave in order to scare the living daylights out of us with their Macbeth!

And remember, you can read all 11 issues of Shakespeare Magazine completely free here.