Earlier this year, Professor Michael Dobson, the director of the UK’s Shakespeare Institute, visited a university in Ukraine to talk about ‘Spaces for Shakespeare’ (and beer!)

Michael Dobson lecturing
On 7 May 2018 Professor Michael Dobson gave a lecture titled Spaces for Shakespeare at the Ukrainian Shakespeare Centre, Zaporizhzhya Classical Private University, in south east Ukraine.

The Director of the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon, Professor Dobson spoke to a packed lecture theatre of students, teachers and academics from across central and southern Eastern Ukraine.

Following a lively introduction by Director of the Centre, Professor Nataliya Torkut on Shakespeare Days in Ukraine 2018 (a multi-centre Shakespeare festival), there was an enjoyable, wide ranging and insightful lecture by Michael Dobson on Spaces for Shakespeare.

The audience in Zaporizhzhia
“Any space can be a space for Shakespeare,” Professor Dobson stated, “and the more spaces that are a space for Shakespeare the better.”

The lecture took us through the history of Shakespeare’s plays (“His plays are a conversation – always eloquent.”) and performance of them, via the theatres and other places where they have been performed. Trends and styles of different periods in Britain, Europe, the USA, Canada and Australia were covered. Usually-overlooked places in Britain discussed included Middlesborough’s purpose-built post-war theatre, St. Mary’s Guildhall in Coventry, Maddermarket Theare in Norwich, and the planned Shakespeare Playhouse at Prescot, near Liverpool.

Michael Dobson and Nataliya Torkut
Professor Dobson’s observations ranged from the serious (“It is vitally important that countries as well as having their own culture have culture in common.”) to the light-hearted (“Hamlet is a brilliant stand-up comic as well as a doomed young man.”)

He also addressed a question about Shakespeare authorship theories. He revealed that he spent much time in every lecture dealing with this, and that Shakespeare seemed to simply attract the attention of a significant amount of people who psychologically were attracted to conspiracy theories. Dobson pointed out that there is lots of evidence that William Shakespeare wrote Shakespeare and no evidence that any one else did. (The very same week, Prospect Magazine published an article with similar conclusions but more provocative language: ‘Think Shakespeare wasn’t Shakespeare? You might just be a snob’).

More agreeably, Dobson addressed the role of beer in Shakespeare theatre. “Elizabethan theatre started as pub theatre,” he explained. “You can get a very good range of beer at the RSC, the Globe, at every major theatre. Shakespeare writes beautifully about beer.”

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